Danish modern dining room

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Published at Sunday, 3 May 2020.

DECOR EXCLUSION METHOD - THIS WORKS. In rooms where decor is redundant, it is worth trying the method of exclusion - just remove some of the little things. Leave only the most colorful, but at the same time simple things, the presence of which really benefits the interior. The free space looks much more comfortable than it is filled with knick-knacks. TIME MANAGEMENT IS NECESSARY IN THE CREATIVE PROCESS. After the choice of finishing materials is made, immediately proceed to their purchase or order. Refuse to be overly optimistic about delivery times. It is much more reasonable to assume that various delays and delays of suppliers are the norm, and not an exception to the rule. This principle will save a lot of time and energy. But do not forget to find a place in advance to store all the ordered materials and things. PAPPIOUS DINING ROOMS - IN THE PAST. If the house has a separate dining room, then for unknown reasons they seek to make it as grandiose as possible. Probably, guided by associations with ancient castles, where the whole family decorously ate food several times a day. But times have changed, and in a heavy and pathos atmosphere, a modern person will feel uncomfortable. Therefore, it is better to strive to create a pleasant and relaxing atmosphere in the dining room.

Danish modern is a style of minimalist furniture and housewares from Denmark associated with the Danish design movement. In the 1920s, Kaare Klint embraced the principles of Bauhaus modernism in furniture design, creating clean, pure lines based on an understanding of classical furniture craftsmanship coupled with careful research into materials, proportions and the requirements of the human body. With designers such as Arne Jacobsen and Hans Wegner and associated cabinetmakers, Danish furniture thrived from the 1940s through the 1960s. Adopting mass-production techniques and concentrating on form rather than just function, Finn Juhl contributed to the style’s success. Danish housewares adopting a similar minimalist design such as cutlery and trays of teak and stainless steel and dinnerware such as those produced in Denmark for Dansk in its early years, expanded the Danish modern aesthetic beyond furniture.

STYLE - THIS CONDITION. Denying the boundaries of existing styles is not part of our plans. But in the process of decorating living space, you should not strictly observe them. Much more important is how the owners of the house feel themselves in it, and not the full compliance of the design with a certain style. GOOD TASTE - THIS CONDITION. At first glance, the concept of "good taste" is fundamental in the design and decoration of the interior. But in reality it is conditional. It is better to focus not on observing the boundaries of good taste, but on whether a particular decorating solution is suitable for a particular room. BIG AND SMALL IN ONE ROOM. The rules of scale, according to which the sizes of objects should correspond to the area of ​​the room, have not been canceled. But in order for the situation to acquire character and expressiveness, it is worth a little to move away from its strict observance. One or two large objects in a small room will contribute to a visual increase in space. DISCLAIMER OF AGGRESSIVE FORMS AND COLORS. Most professional decorators are of the opinion that the main and necessary characteristics of a living space are comfort and a relaxing atmosphere. It is better to create a corner of calm in the house than to opt for aggressive shapes and colors.

Danish modern dining room